At the center of this project is the love that my parents have for me as their son, and how that love mirrors the love that families have had throughout the ages, and how love can move mountains. For most of history if a child like me was born laws insisted that he or she was the victim of “exposure”. This meant that the child was left exposed to the elements and left to die, or thrown off of a cliff or disposed off in any number of ways. Yet, through out history many families defied empires and refused to kill their children. They loved them fiercely and because of that love, raised children that grew up to be emperors, champions and leaders. My parents’ love for me is why I am who I am today. That love defied all manner of odds stacked against me. Their love is why I now see that the body I have is a treasure. Their unwavering support of me for the last 38 years is a gift I can never repay, but with the creation of this theatre piece I hope to repay some of that debt with a theatre piece that honors their life mission to help the world see “disability” not as a weakness but as its own version of strength. I want to use my parents love and the knowledge that I have gained through that love to reclaim the word “Exposure”. “Exposure” will become the idea that when we all expose our unique strengths, challenges and weaknesses that the definitions “abled” and “disabled” cease to exist. I chose to do this now because in July of 2015 my father was diagnosed with brain cancer. As my family faces this new challenge, I hope to be able to honor my parents with the creation of this work.

My father has been a visual artist and teacher his entire life. He taught me that art can convey experience in a unique and assessable way, that it allows people to unlock insights about themselves and others in a profound way. Exposure will allow participants to be exposed to the experiences of my life, in a unique and artist ways to allow the audience can embody the strengths based perspective to allow the audience to charge their challenges. This project will utilize multi-media, acrobatics, dance, dramatic narrative and immersive experiences to produce an experience of and a discourse about disability not seen before. The mission of the “Exposure” project is to bridge the gap between the abled and the disabled and to "expose" the common human experience. We hope to promote further exploration of these concepts for the audience as they move through their own lives.

At the center of this project is the love that my parents have for me as their son, and how that love mirrors the love that families have had throughout the ages, and how love can move mountains. For most of history if a child like me was born laws insisted that he or she was the victim of “exposure”. This meant that the child was left exposed to the elements and left to die, or thrown off of a cliff or disposed off in any number of ways. Yet, through out history many families defied empires and refused to kill their children. They loved them fiercely and because of that love, raised children that grew up to be emperors, champions and leaders. My parents’ love for me is why I am who I am today. That love defied all manner of odds stacked against me. Their love is why I now see that the body I have is a treasure. Their unwavering support of me for the last 38 years is a gift I can never repay, but with the creation of this theatre piece I hope to repay some of that debt with a theatre piece that honors their life mission to help the world see “disability” not as a weakness but as its own version of strength. I want to use my parents love and the knowledge that I have gained through that love to reclaim the word “Exposure”. “Exposure” will become the idea that when we all expose our unique strengths, challenges and weaknesses that the definitions “abled” and “disabled” cease to exist. I chose to do this now because in July of 2015 my father was diagnosed with brain cancer. As my family faces this new challenge, I hope to be able to honor my parents with the creation of this work.

An Extraordinary Life


My name is Matt Purinton and I was born with TAR syndrome. Among other things, this means that I was born without arms and with legs that operate on a limited basis and in a very different way than most people’s legs operate. Individuals with my syndrome are called “Tartians” and for a large part of my life I felt like an alien in this word. In fact, some of my earliest memories are about trying to bridge the divide between the physically abled and physically disabled. What I have come to discover is that, in fact, that divide doesn't truly exist at all. The project “Exposure” is the culmination of those efforts and that realization. I hope to create a theatrical experience that can share and "expose" these ideas with the world.

My father has been a visual artist and teacher his entire life. He taught me that art can convey experience in a unique and assessable way, that it allows people to unlock insights about themselves and others in a profound way. Exposure will allow participants to be exposed to the experiences of my life, in a unique and artist ways to allow the audience can embody the strengths based perspective to allow the audience to charge their challenges. This project will utilize multi-media, acrobatics, dance, dramatic narrative and immersive experiences to produce an experience of and a discourse about disability not seen before. The mission of the “Exposure” project is to bridge the gap between the abled and the disabled and to "expose" the common human experience. We hope to promote further exploration of these concepts for the audience as they move through their own lives.

Exposure will tell the true life story of Matt Purinton, who was born with the rare genetic disorder of TAR Syndrome.

​a new play